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Courses at the 300-level

GEOG 300: Disaster Management

Focus is on societal responses to disasters and the systems created to deal with such phenomena. Included are causes of disasters and plans formulated to cope with them. (Formerly GEOG 313.)
4 credit hours

GEOG 301: Natural Resource Management

The extent and variety of natural resource use is examined, the environmental impacts thereof, and the management philosophies and efforts to regulate this use for the benefit of contemporary and future populations.
4 credit hours

GEOG 303: Historical Geography of the United States

The historical development of the United States is examined from a geographical perspective. Emphasis is on the interaction of physical and cultural elements that contribute to the emergence of distinctive landscapes. (Formerly GEOG 312.)
4 credit hours

GEOG 304: Geography of Rhode Island

Discussion centers on the geographic elements in the history and development of Rhode Island. Rhode Island's place in the New England, national, and world scenes is assessed. (Formerly GEOG 305.)
4 credit hours

GEOG 305: Geography of Rhode Island

Discussion centers on the geographic elements in the history and development of Rhode Island. Assessment is made of Rhode Island's place in the New England, national, and world scenes.
3 credit hours

GEOG 306: Geographic Skills and Methods

Skills and methods in theoretical and applied geography are covered. Interpretation of maps and data gathered through remote sensing is followed by the application of spatial data to problem solving in the social and environmental sciences.
3 credit hours

GEOG 307: Coastal Geography

The diverse geographic aspects of the land-sea interface are analyzed. Topics include coastal geomorphology and climate, fisheries, and other natural resources, patterns of land use, and coastal regionalism. (Formerly GEOG 320.)
4 credit hours

GEOG 308: Geographic Information Systems II

GIS is used by students in the computer laboratory to produce complex, multi-layered maps of various spatial phenomena at a level designed to promote proficiency with the latest analytical software.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • GEOG 202
GEOG 309: New England Landscapes Pre-1900

New England's rich legacy of historical landscapes form the basis for this field-trip course. Topics include urbanization, traditional land uses, industrialization, leisure landscapes, maritime activities, and the evolution of landscape architecture. (Formerly GEOG 407.)
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of any course in a social science or consent of department chair.
GEOG 310: New England Landscapes since 1900

Field studies are conducted of maturing twentieth-century New England landscapes. Topics include the coastal zone, the metropolis, the rural/urban fringe, and rural New England. (Formerly GEOG 408.)
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of any course in a social science or consent of department chair
GEOG 312: Historical Geography of the United States

The historical development of the United States is examined from a geographical viewpoint. Emphasis is on the interaction of physical and cultural elements that contribute to the emergence of distinctive landscapes, past and present.
3 credit hours

GEOG 313: Disaster Management

Focus is on societal responses to disasters and the systems created to deal with such phenomena. Included are causes of disasters and plans formulated to cope with them.
3 credit hours

GEOG 320: Coastal Geography

The diverse geographic aspects of the land-sea interface are analyzed. Topics include coastal geomorphology and climate, fisheries and other natural resources, patterns of land use, and coastal regionalism.
3 credit hours

GEOG 337: Urban Political Geography

Geographic and political analyses are used to study the growth of cities. Discussion includes the role of cities on local, national, and world scales. Students cannot receive credit for both GEOG 337 and POL 337.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of any 100- or 200-level geography or political science course, or consent of department chair
GEOG 338: People, Houses, Neighborhoods, and Cities

City planning and housing development are studied within the context of how and why neighborhoods change over time. Attention is given to land use plans, zoning maps, and the city building process.
3 credit hours

GEOG 339: Metropolitan Providence: Past, Present, and Future

The historic growth, subsequent decline, and modern renaissance of Providence are examined. Topics include local politics, public policies, and major public building projects.
3 credit hours

PAD 325: Public Budgeting and Human Resource Administration

Emphasis is on the central role of public budgets in policy formation and on the search for balance among a representative public work force, neutral competence, and political responsiveness. (Formerly Politics of Public Management: Budgeting and Personnel Administration.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 301 or consent of department chair
POL 300: Methodology in Political Science

The approaches and methods of empirical political science research are surveyed. Emphasis is on research design, data collection, and interpretation.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • any Gen. Ed. Mathematics course
  • or consent of department chair
POL 301: Foundations of Public Administration

The art and science of public administration is introduced. Focus is on the administrative leadership necessary to manage government agencies within the American political system.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of department chair
POL 303: International Law and Organization

Both twentieth-century international organization and the place of evolving international law are considered with respect to the settlement of disputes and the maintenance of peace.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 203 or consent of department chair
POL 304: Research Methods II

Students develop skill in the preparation, analysis, and interpretation of data. Lecture and laboratory. Students cannot receive credit for both POL 304 and SOC 404.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 300 or SOC 302
  • or consent of department chair
POL 306: State and Local Government

Students examine the political structures, processes, policies, and power distributions in state and local governments in the United States. Topics include intergovernmental relations, executive leadership, and legislative policy making.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of department chair
POL 307: Political Behavior

Students examine how individuals interact with the American political system. Topics include political socialization, political psychology, public opinion, voting behavior, and other forms of mass political participation.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
POL 308: Current Political Controversy

Students learn the art and science of political analysis by critically reading and writing about political controversies currently in the news while learning to use the tools and data available to political scientists.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • and completion of 30 credits
POL 309: Women and Politics

Focus is on the increasing involvement of women in the politics and issues of contemporary America. Women's political socialization, voting behavior, and political roles in government are also discussed.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202 or consent of department chair.
POL 315: Western Legal Systems

This is a comparative study of English common law and continental European civil law. Students cannot receive credit for both POL 315 and HIST 315.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of one of the following: HIST 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, or 161
  • or consent of department chair
POL 316: Modern Western Political Thought

The ideas of major Western political thinkers are reviewed. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 316 and POL 316. (Formerly POL 310: Political Thought and the Modern World.)
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 204
  • or consent of department chair
POL 317: Politics and Society

Relationships of power and authority and their social foundations are examined. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of the following: HIST 317, POL 317, and SOC 317.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 204
  • or consent of department chair
POL 327: Internship in State Government

Through field placements in the government of Rhode Island, students are able to integrate classroom theory with political reality. Included is a weekly lecture series involving the participation of appropriate political leaders and academics.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Recommendation of the Academic Advisory Committee to the State Internship Commission
POL 328: Field Experiences in the Public Sector

Students are assigned to local, state, or national agencies, political parties, or interest groups. Assignments relate field experiences to academic concepts.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • consent of department chair
POL 330: Administrative Law and Regulatory Politics

Students examine procedural law remedies of regulatory agencies, as well as rule making, adjudication, judicial review of administrative decisions, and the politics of regulation.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 301
  • or consent of the department chair
POL 331: Courts and Public Policy

Students examine the role of courts in forming and implementing public policy. Topics include litigation strategies, the selection of judges, judicial activism, and the impact of court decisions on society.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
POL 332: Civil Liberties in the United States

Traditional constitutional guarantees of civil liberty and due process in American life are examined. Included is an examination of legal decisions and the justifications offered for those decisions.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
POL 333: Law and Politics of Civil Rights

Struggles for legal and political equality are examined, with primary focus on discrimination based on race, sex, and sexual orientation. Interactions among law, political institutions, interest groups, and social movements are also explored.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202 or consent of department chair
POL 335: Jurisprudence and the American Judicial Process

The nature of law is examined through the analysis of selected theories of jurisprudence. Attention is given to judicial organization and process, judicial administration and politics, and judicial behavior at both the state and national levels.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • One 200-level political science course
  • or consent of department chair
POL 336: State and Society in the Third World

The origins of preindustrial non-Western states are examined as issues of power, class, statecraft, and empire. Students cannot receive credit for both Political Science 336 and Anthropology 336.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Any 200-level anthropology or political science course
  • or consent of the department chair
POL 337: Urban Political Geography

Geographic and political analyses are used to study the growth of cities. Consideration is given to the role of cities on local, national, and world scales. Students cannot receive credit for both GEOG 337 and POL 337.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Any 200-level geography or political science course
  • or consent of department chair
POL 341: The Politics of Developing Nations

Emphasis is on theories of political development and the analysis of developmental problems, including terrorism, the role of the military, instability, and the alteration of political cultures.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 203
  • or consent of department chair
POL 342: The Politics of Global Economic Change

Students examine economic globalization, including trade, finance, and migration, from different perspectives. Emphasis is on causes and political consequences of globalization.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 203
  • or consent of department chair
POL 343: The Politics of Western Democracies

The political structures, processes, and policies of the principal West European and Anglo-American postindustrial societies are compared and analyzed.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • One 200-level political science course or
  • or consent of department chair
POL 345: International Nongovernmental Organizations

From an interdisciplinary perspective, the various roles of international nongovernmental organizations are examined. Students cannot receive credit for both INGO 300 and POL 345.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 203 or consent of program director.
POL 346: Foreign Policy

American foreign policy, decision making, and politics are examined. The policies and decision-making particulars of other governments are developed where appropriate. (Formerly POL 446.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 203
POL 353: Parties and Elections

Political parties and the American system of elections are analyzed. Also covered are the organizational aspects of the parties, mass voting behavior, the impact of elections on policymaking, and national and state trends. (Formerly Parties, Interest Groups, and the Media.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of department chair
POL 354: Interest Group Politics

This is an in-depth examination of interest groups and the roles they play in American politics. Topics include group formation and maintenance, lobbyists and lobbying, electioneering, issue advocacy, and campaign finance.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of dept chair
POL 355: Policy Formation Process

Public policy formulation, from input to output, by the major institutions of government is studied. Included are the internal processes and interactions of legislatures and executives. (Formerly POL 455.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202 or consent of department chair
POL 357: The American Presidency

The constitutional and institutional evolution of the presidency is studied, including the demands and resources of the office. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 332 and POL 357.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • any 200-level history or political science course
  • or consent of department chair
POL 358: The American Congress

Students examine the development of Congress and assess its structure, the behavior of its members, and its role in American politics.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of department chair
POL 359: Politics and the Media

The role media plays in politics is analyzed. Topics include media evolution and regulation and the relationship between media and political institutions/policy in the United States. (Formerly Political and Governmental Communications.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • POL 202
  • or consent of department chair
POL 371: Readings in Political Science

The student engages in independent readings.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Consent of advisor and instructor
  • Major in political science
POL 381: Workshop in Public Service

Selected topics are investigated in various formats.
1-4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Prerequisites vary
POL 390: Independent Research in Political Science

Students select a topic and undertake concentrated research under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • consent of department chair, faculty advisor, and dean

Page last updated: March 20, 2006