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Courses at the 200-level

GEOG 200: World Regional Geography

The geographic elements of major world areas are assessed. Focus is on physical and cultural elements in a comparative context.
4 credit hours

GEOG 201: Mapping Our Changing World

Basic mapping theories, models, and techniques enable students to become knowledgeable, critical consumers of the geographic data that is promulgated by government, industry, and the popular media.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • General Education Math Requirement
  • General Education Advanced Quantitative/Scientific Reasoning
GEOG 202: Geographic Information Systems I

Introductory concepts and techniques, with hands-on laboratory experience, enable students to produce their own GIS maps of human and environmental phenomena.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • GEOG 201
  • or consent of department chair
GEOG 205: Earth's Physical Environments

Atmospheric, oceanic, and landform processes are studied as they shape and give character to the surface of the earth.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • General Education Math Requirement
  • General Education Advanced Quantitative/Scientific Reasoning
GEOG 206: Disaster Management

Focus is on societal responses to disasters and the systems created to deal with such phenomena. Included are causes of disasters and plans formulated to cope with them. (Formerly GEOG 300.)
4 credit hours

GEOG 261: Globalization, Cities and Sustainability

The consequences of migration to the world’s great cities are studied in comparative context. The forces of globalization and the prospects for more sustainable communities in the 21st Century are examined. Hybrid course.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • FYW, FYS and at least 45 credits.
GEOG 263: Human Response to Natural Disasters

How humans perceive and respond to natural disasters is a function of culture. Human responses to disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, and volcanic eruptions, are explored through examination of cases drawn from around the globe.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2, and 3
POL 200: Introduction to Political Science

The scope and methods of political science are introduced along with political ideologies, socialization, and institutions.
3 credit hours

POL 201: Development of American Democracy

The struggle for democratic values, political institutions, and social freedoms from the Revolution to the present are considered. Landmark documents and themes in America’s political history are analyzed.
4 credit hours

POL 201\: Oral Traditions

Various forms of spoken traditions are studied as cultural manifestations. These include myths, legends, folktales, parables, poetry, riddles, and games.
4 credit hours

POL 202: American Government

The institutions and principles of American national government are examined. Topics include the constitutional foundation, federalism, political parties, Congress, the presidency, the Supreme Court, and civil rights.
4 credit hours

POL 203: Global Politics

This is an introduction to the governance of other contemporary national political systems and to the forces, principles, and transnational arrangements of international politics.
4 credit hours

POL 204: Introduction to Political Thought

Fundamental concepts and issues of philosophy and political theory are investigated. Basic precepts about authority, law, government, and the terms of obligation are examined in light of contemporary concerns.
4 credit hours

POL 208: Introduction to the Law

How the law and legal system affect the everyday lives of citizens is analyzed. Emphasis is on topics of current concern at all levels of government.
3 credit hours

POL 261: Global Competition: The United States and Its Trading Partners

Issues surrounding global economic competition are examined along with the merits of free trade for the United States and other global competitors.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2 and 3
POL 262: Power and Community

The observation and use of power shapes many traditions of political inquiry. Students explore these traditions in Western and non-Western thought, with emphasis on the effort to understand power in diverse urban communities.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2 and 3
POL 263: Citizenship, National Identity, and Immigration

The ways in which different societies have dealt with citizenship, immigration, and national identity are introduced. Emphasis is on comparative analysis and the moral issues involved in debates over citizenship and immigration.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2 and 3
POL 264: Federalism and Nation Building

Literature produced by the development of American federalism and its relevance to contemporary issues in diverse cultural settings is studied.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2 and 3
POL 265: Politics and Popular Culture: Global Perspectives

Students investigate the intersection of politics and popular culture in Western and non-Western societies by examining entertainment values, their relationship to political culture and behavior, and the debate over globalization.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Gen. Ed. Core 1, 2, and 3
POL 266: Investing in the Next Global Economy

Students study nations around the world pursuing success in global economic competition. The course will compare economic development and investment opportunities of nations and their businesses.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • FYW, FYS and at least 45 credits.
POL 267: Immigration, Citizenship, and National Identity

Students investigate how different societies have dealt with citizenship and immigration issues and how conceptions of nationhood influence citizenship and immigration debates.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • FYW, FYS and at least 45 credits.

Page last updated: March 20, 2006