Richard Kremer to present the 2009 Gehrenbeck lecture April 28

Richard L. Kremer, associate professor of history at Dartmouth College, will deliver the 14th Annual Richard K. Gehrenbeck Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 28, at 8 p.m. in Clarke Science 128. It is intended for a general audience and is open to the public.

The lecture is entitled “Launching American Astrophysics: An Astronomer, an Instrument, and a Book.”

Kremer teaches courses in the history of science, medicine and technology. He earned a BA from Goshen College and a PhD in the history of science from Harvard University.

He specializes in European science from the 15th through the 19th centuries with a particular interest in early modern astronomy and physics, and the history of the medical sciences and universities.

His books include "The Thermodynamics of Life and Experimental Physiology" (Garland 1990), a study of experiment in nineteenth-century medicine; "Letters of Hermann von Helmholtz to His Wife, 1849-1859" (Steiner 1990), an edition of early letters by a leading German physicist and cultural icon; and "The Practice of Alfonsine Astronomy in the Fifteenth Century" (forthcoming), an analysis of early printed almanacs.

Kremer's current research examines responses to Copernican astronomy in astrological calendars printed between 1543-1630. His work has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, National Science Foundation, Humboldt Foundation, and the Howard Foundation.

Richard Gehrenbeck taught physics and astronomy at RIC for 22 years until his death in 1993. His doctoral degree from the University of Minnesota was in the history of science, and his course, The Rise of Modern Science, was an innovative lab-based introduction to that field. The Gehrenbeck lecture, presented each year in his memory, brings an active scholar to the College each year to present a public lecture on a topic related to the history of science.

For further information contact James G. Magyar, Physical Sciences Department, at (401) 456-8049 or jmagyar@ric.edu.

Details posted at http://www.ric.edu/faculty/organic/gehrenbeck.