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RIC Celebrates Successful Effort to Pass Question 3

From left are RIC Professor Jason Blank, president, RIC/AFT; Mary Riley, president, Council 94, Local 2879; Scott Duhamel, business representative, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades; Gregory Mancini, executive director, Build RI; Kyla Pecchia, president, RIC Student Community Government; and RIC President Nancy Carriuolo.

From left are RIC Professor Jason Blank, president, RIC/AFT; Mary Riley, president, Council 94, Local 2879; Scott Duhamel, business representative, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades; Gregory Mancini, executive director, Build RI; Kyla Pecchia, president, RIC Student Community Government; and RIC President Nancy Carriuolo.

On Election Day, Rhode Island voters said “yes” to Question 3. So on Nov. 8, Rhode Island College held a small celebration that included expressions of appreciation, a few just-for-fun prizes, and cake for everyone.

Many in the RIC community joined RIC President Nancy Carriuolo in Donovan Dining Center to recognize the effort to pass the bond referendum, which will fund renovations to Craig-Lee and Gaige Halls and the Nursing/Allied Health Care area of Fogarty Life Science Building.


RIC President Nancy Carriuolo is joined by friend and independent filmmaker Carla Ricci and her dog Stitch (“Best Canine Booster”) at a RIC celebration marking the approval of Question 3.

For their role in helping pass the bond issue, Carriuolo thanked students, faculty, administrators, alums, the RIC Foundation, friends of the college, legislators, church groups, unions and other organizations.

Kyla Pecchia, president of RIC Student Community Government, presented Carriuolo with flowers on behalf of the student body to thank the president for her motivation and leadership in the campaign to secure funding for the college.

“First and foremost passing Question 3 is a signal from the voters that they care about the education of our students, and they believe that RIC is an institution of quality,” Carriuolo said.

She noted that the push for funding the renovations has been “in the works for a very long time.” The effort began in 2010 after a facilities master plan indicated that the college’s classroom buildings, with the exception of Alger Hall, were in poor condition. With the report in hand, Carriuolo worked to get funding for the aging facilities, first enlisting the support of the Board of Governors for Higher Education. Next, she received approval from the Governor’s office, the House and Senate Finance Committees and, finally, the General Assembly.

Now that the project is officially a go, RIC will be rewarded with “a teaching and learning environment that will support the 21st century curriculum with technology and learning spaces that are designed for modern teaching,” Carriuolo said.

Work on renovating and modernizing the buildings is expected to begin in March, with a planned completion date of January 2017.

“Through the statewide campaign, the public has learned about RIC and why it’s worthy of support,” Carriuolo said. “We’re no longer the hidden jewel of the state. Every vote for Question 3 was a vote of confidence in Rhode Island College.”