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INTRODUCTION

This Curriculum Committee Manual is intended for orientation of persons newly involved with the work of that committee (either as new members or as preparers of proposals for action by the Committee). This manual also serves others as a convenient reminder of the precedents that have been established, and a consolidation of existing practice and past experience.

CHAPTER I

by-laws regarding the curriculum committee

The Curriculum Committee is a Committee of the Council of Rhode Island College and as such is subject to all the requirements and regulations of Council committees that apply. The following articles refer to appropriate sections of the Rhode Island College Handbook of Policies, Practices, and Regulations and detail the responsibilities and regulations of the Curriculum Committee.

1.1 Article on General Provisions Regarding Council Committees

Unless otherwise specified herein, the following provisions shall regulate the conduct and the execution of business of each committee constituted and empowered under the Charter:

a. Unless a by-law governing a particular committee explicitly provides for a council committee to take final action on a matter, council committees serve in an advisory capacity to the Council of Rhode Island College or to the President, or to both.

b. A quorum of each committee shall be a majority of the voting members of that committee.

c. Each committee shall meet at least once during each academic semester and as many times thereafter as shall be necessary and appropriate to execute its charge. A copy of the minutes of each of the committee’s meetings shall be forwarded to the Executive Committee when distributed.

d. Each committee shall submit to the Council of Rhode Island College a report of its activities at least once each year. This report is to be placed and maintained in the Council’s public file.

e. The by-law governing a particular committee and the foregoing general provisions (a–d above) governing all committees shall take effect for a particular committee when the Executive Committee certifies that it is appropriate for the committee to be governed by them or when the President has acted on all revisions in the by-laws governing committees that were recommended to the Council of Rhode Island College by the By-Laws Committee during the second semester of the 1981–82 academic year.

 

1.2 Article on Curriculum Committee

A. Duties and Responsibilities

According to Article XIV to the Rhode Island College Handbook of Policies, Practices, and Regulations the responsibilities of the Curriculum Committee are as follows:

1. Approve of the undergraduate and graduate curricula. (Implementation of Curriculum Committee decisions is subject to action by the President of the College.)

2. Initiate study of new curricula or changes in curricula, and consider suggestions for curriculum development from the administration, schools, departments, individual faculty members, and students. Consult faculty concerned with particular curriculum proposals under consideration.

3. Issue annual reports to the faculty on the decisions of the Committee, issue reports on subsequent action taken on these decisions, and issue the list of proposals that remain on the calendar.

4. Meet at least once each semester, whenever possible, to review and evaluate the curriculum in general, to consider important problems and deficiencies in the curriculum, and to discuss its major goals and directions. Such meetings may be conducted largely under suspension of rules and without a formal agenda of specific proposals.

5. Receive and review periodic reports from departments concerning the status of individual honors programs. Recommend the general academic standards and requirements applicable to all honors programs, allowing for a degree of flexibility based on the inherent characteristics of individual disciplines.

6. Provide assistance and information to any department that is establishing an honors program.

7. Receive and review all proposed honors programs and any subsequent revisions. Recommend acceptance or rejection of such proposals.

8. Rule on appeals in cases where prospective candidates to department honors programs do not meet the academic requirement for acceptance.

9. Consider possible modifications of Committee's function in relation to the suggested establishment of an honors curriculum or honors college.

 

10. The secretary shall distribute the recorded minutes of each meeting to the members of the Committee and to other persons deemed appropriate.

11. Hold a meeting at least once a month during the academic year. A faculty member may attend any meeting.

12. Except in emergencies specified in the call of the meeting, print an agenda in the Briefs one week prior to each meeting.

B. Membership of the Curriculum Committee

The Curriculum Committee shall consist of 24 members. (Approved by the Council of Rhode Island College on May 1992; and approved by the President the same year. Amended by Council in March 1998; approved by the President in April 1998.)

1. Arts: Two (2) faculty members from the Departments of Art, Communications, and Music Theatre and Dance.

2. Humanities: Two (2) faculty members from the Departments of English, History, Modern Languages, and Philosophy.

3. Social Sciences: Two (2) faculty members from the Departments of Anthropology/
Geography, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.

4. Science: Two (2) faculty members from the Departments of Biology, Mathematics/
Computer Science, and Physical Sciences.

5. Professional Programs: Six (6) faculty members selected as follows:

a. One (1) faculty member from the Center for Management and Technology.

b. Three (3) faculty members from Education Departments, i.e. (Counseling and Educational Psychology; Educational Studies; Elementary Education; Health Education; Physical Education and Recreation; and Special Education.

c. One (1) faculty member from the Department of Nursing.

d. One (1) faculty member from the School of Social Work.

6. Chair of the Committee on General Education (COGE).

7. Two (2) undergraduate students appointed annually as directed by Student Parliament.

 

8. One (1) graduate student accepted into a graduate program, appointed annually as directed by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

9. Six (6) members of the administration that shall include the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Dean of the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development, the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, the Dean of the School of Social Work, the Director of the Center for Management and Technology, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

The 14 faculty members of the Curriculum Committee shall serve for two years in such a manner as to provide for staggered terms with the five faculty categories defined above. No more than one faculty member from any department may sit on the Curriculum Committee at the same time with the exception of the Chair of COGE who may be from a department that has another member on the Curriculum Committee.

 

CHAPTER II

Framework of the Curriculum Committee

2.1 The Organizational Position of the Curriculum Committee

The Curriculum Committee was established by Article XIV of the By-Law of the Council of Rhode Island College.

The text of this by-law is reproduced as Chapter I in this manual and in the Rhode Island College Handbook of Policies, Practices, and Regulations. (Rev. 1993).

On most matters within the Curriculum Committee’s jurisdiction, the by-law delegates to the Curriculum Committee the power to make decisions without referring back to the Council of Rhode Island College, subject to approval by the President of the College. In cases of new programs that were not included in previously authorized functions of the College, approval by the Board of Governors for Higher Education is required.

The normal functioning of the Curriculum Committee is largely self-contained except for the approvals just mentioned.

2.2 The Responsibilities of Members

As specified in the By-Laws, the Curriculum Committee consists of 14 faculty members, the Chair of the Committee on General Education, six members of the administration, two undergraduate students, and one graduate student. All have equal vote.

It is the responsibility of each member of the Curriculum Committee to exercise his/her best judgment as to the good of the College’s programs as a whole, even though the member is chosen by, or on behalf of, a particular constituency.

The principal exercise of this judgment is in the discussion and voting in the meetings. Experience shows that in order to exercise this judgment well, members need to "do their homework"—to read and digest before the meeting the materials distributed for consideration. Discussion in the meeting may bring out aspects not clear in the proposal or alternative ways of accomplishing the desired result. Members should try to contribute to this in appropriate cases.

At times, members are needed for subcommittees or special studies.

Members also have a liaison function, both with the College community as a whole and especially with their own constituency. This includes answering questions, alerting appropriate persons to matters of interest to them, helping preparers of proposals who are unfamiliar with Curriculum Committee procedures, seeing that matters of interest are not lost sight of, and keeping a finger on the constituency’s pulse.

2.3 The Responsibilities of Officers

The officers of the Curriculum Committee consist of the Chair, the Secretary, and the Executive Committee elected annually from and by the membership of the Curriculum Committee.

n The Chair of the Curriculum Committee has the following responsibilities:

1. Receive proposals and check for completeness.

2. Assign document numbers for proposals received.

3. Record reception dates.

4. Keep a log of proposals received.

5. Inform the preparer of proposals that they have been received.

6. Prepare and publish the agenda for each meeting.

7. Convene and conduct the regular monthly (and any special) meetings of the Curriculum Committee according to the rules of order.

8. Serve as a member of the Executive Committee of the Rhode Island College Curriculum Committee; convene and chair the Executive Committee.

9. Inform the College community of the meeting dates of the Curriculum Committee, of the Executive Committee's deadlines for submission of proposals for catalog inclusion, and of Curriculum Committee action.

10. Forward the Curriculum Committee’s recommendations to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and to the President. If recommendations are approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the President, copies of the recommendations are forwarded to the originator of the proposal, to the appropriate dean or director, to the Office of News and Publications, to the Records Office (three copies – one for the Director of Records Office and the two Recorders), to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and to the Chair of the Curriculum Committee. Since approved recommendations are forwarded to the Office of News and Publications, proposals should contain accurate copy for catalog additions, deletions, and/or revisions.

11. Check with the Office of Publishing Services and the Records Office to assure proposals have arrived.

12. Sit on the College Mission and Goals Committee and serve as liaison between the Curriculum Committee and the College Mission and Goals Committee.

13. Ensure that minutes of meetings are recorded.

14. Act as Corresponding Secretary for the Curriculum Committee.

15. Communicate with the preparer of a proposal about the reasons for committee action, in the event that a proposal is rejected or referred back to the preparer.

16. Appoint members to several subcommittees, ad hoc committees, and committees to conduct special studies or investigations.

17. Inform subcommittee chairs, directors, and deans of reporting requirements.

18. Keep the Curriculum Committee manual up to date.

19. Others as required.

n The Secretary of the Curriculum Committee has the following responsibilities:

1. Prepare the minutes of each meeting. (Minutes must include revisions and/or amendments to proposals resulting from action taken by the Curriculum Committee so that an accurate record of this action is available.)

2. Keep records of attendance by committee members. Names of members with more than three unexcused absences shall be referred to the Executive Committee of the Council of Rhode Island College for appropriate action.

3. Serve as a member of the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee.

4. Prepare annual reports of actions taken by the Curriculum Committee and distribute such to the membership, to the Council of Rhode Island College, and to other appropriate persons. Clerical support is currently furnished by the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

n The Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee shall include the Chair, the Secretary, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and two faculty elected from and by the membership. The election of these officers is to be held in the preceding May to facilitate transition. The officers and members of the Executive Committee take office in May. The Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee have the following responsibilities:

1. Meet with the Chair of the Curriculum Committee at least ten days prior to any scheduled meeting of the Curriculum Committee to set the agenda and plan procedural steps for the upcoming meeting.

2. Screen documents submitted to the Curriculum Committee for clarity, completeness, and correctness, as well as contradictions to policy and/or practice of the Curriculum Committee and the College.

3. Recommend "return to sender" actions for documents that need major revisions in order to meet requirements of clarity, completeness, correctness, and/or consistency with the policy and practice of the College and the Curriculum Committee. NB. It is the policy of the committee that documents returned for revision must come to the Executive Committee a second time for a second screening.

4. Prepare amendments to be offered at the upcoming meeting of the Curriculum Committee for those documents that need only minor alteration to meet the criteria of clarity, completeness, correctness, and/or consistency so these documents may proceed to action of the Curriculum Committee without return to sender and a second screen. The determination of minor or major revisions shall be made by members of the Executive Committee.

5. Identify substantive curricular and/or policy issues that are explicit or implicit in proposals received by the Curriculum Committee, and prepare statements identifying these issues, and (possibly) make recommendation for action to be considered by the Curriculum Committee.

6. Prepare recommendations and/or proposals for revisions, additions, and/or deletions of policy, procedures, and/or practice of the Curriculum Committee.

7. Assist the Chair of the Curriculum Committee regarding committee policy, procedure, or practice of the Curriculum Committee as its policy, procedure, or practice extends beyond the committee to other committees and/or segments of the College.

8. Call attention to and raise discussion of issues regarding policy, procedure, and practice of the College and/or the governing and legislative bodies beyond the College that have curricular relevance.

9. Assist and advise the Chair of the Curriculum Committee in the execution of his/her responsibilities.

10. Others as needed.

 

2.4 The Jurisdiction of the Curriculum Committee

The Curriculum Committee is responsible for approving undergraduate and graduate curricula, including program requirements, addition of new courses, course descriptions, course credits, and honors programs—but not grade index, requirements for graduation, retention standards, nor most administrative arrangements. The responsibility of the Curriculum Committee is generally exercised by acting on proposals sent to the Committee.

The Committee also has responsibility for initiating study of new curricula or changes in curricula and for considering suggestions for curriculum development (see By-Laws). In some cases, initiative may come from the Committee on the mission and goals of the College. The Chair of the Curriculum Committee should be a member of this initiative.

Note: Implementation of Curriculum Committee decisions is subject to action by the President of the College.

2.5 The Curriculum Committee’s Relationship to Other Bodies

The Curriculum Committee is established by a By-Law of the Council of Rhode Island College, but most actions of the Committee do not require reference to the Council. In certain areas, jurisdiction lies with the Council, but the Curriculum Committee can make recommendations to the chairperson of the Council, either on its own initiative or on request from the Council. This applies particularly to grading and to grade index requirements for graduation and retention.

The number of credits each student receives for a course is specified by Curriculum Committee action. Faculty load credits for instruction are determined in accordance with the collective bargaining contract. The grading system to be used for a course is determined by the specific department subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee.

The Curriculum Committee sets curriculum requirements and general policies. The Academic Standing Committee has jurisdiction over requests by individual students for exceptions in individual cases because of special circumstances.

The Committee on Student-Designed Majors and the Committee on Individualized Graduate Programs have, by delegation of its parent, the Curriculum Committee, authority to approve ad hoc designs of majors for individual students. The Committee on Student-Designed Majors and the Committee on Individualized Graduate Programs establish criteria and procedures for the development of individually designed majors and submits the criteria and procedures to the Curriculum Committee for annual review.

The Writing Board operates as a subcommittee of the Curriculum Committee and acts as an advisory body, helping to provide materials, suggestions, and support to individual departments and faculty members. It further supports sharing of information among programs ans sponsors faculty development relevant to writing.

 

 

 

2.5.1 The Committee on Individualized Graduate Programs (Rev. 10/20/95)

The Committee on Individualized Graduate Programs consists of:

n a representative from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences,

n a representative from the Office of the Director of the Center for Management and Technology,

n a representative from the Office of the Dean of the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development,

n the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies (who is chair of the committee) and

n four graduate faculty members (one from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, one from the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development, one from the School of Social Work, and one from the Center for Management and Technology). Faculty members shall be appointed by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee in consultation with the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee for two-year staggered terms.

 

2.5.2 The Committee on Student-Designed Majors (Rev. 10/20/95)

The Committee on Student-Designed Majors consists of seven persons:

n One faculty member from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

n One faculty member from the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development.

n One faculty member from the Center for Management and Technology.

n One representative from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

n One representative from the Office of the Dean of the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development.

n One representative from the Office of the Director of the Center for Management and Technology.

n One student appointed by the President of the Student Parliament.

The student member will serve a term of one year. Faculty members are appointed by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee in consultation with the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee and serve for two-year staggered terms. Representatives from the Office of the Dean and Director are appointed by the Deans or Directors and serve at the pleasure of the Dean or Directors. The Chair of this committee is the representative from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

2.5.3 The Committee on General Education (COGE) (Rev. 12/18/95)

The Committee on General Education consists of 12 persons appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs on the recommendation of the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee (outgoing) for two-year staggered terms according to the following constituencies:

n One member from the Department of English (Core I).

n One member from the Department of History (Core II).

n One member from the several departments that offer Core III courses.

n One member from the Social/Behavioral Sciences (Economics, Political Science, Anthropology/Geography, Afro-American Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Women’s Studies).

n One member from the Visual and Performing Arts (Music, Theatre/Dance, Art).

n One member from Science and Mathematics (Biology, Physical Sciences, Mathematics/Computer Science).

n One member from Humanities (Modern Languages, Philosophy, Communications).

n Two members from the Professional Programs (Nursing, Social Work, Special Education, Elementary Education, Educational Studies, Health/Physical Education/Recreation, Counseling and Educational Psychology, Economics and Finance, Accounting and Computer Information Systems, Management and Technology.

n One student appointed by the President of Student Parliament.

n Vice President of Academic Affairs (or designee).

n Associate Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences (ex officio, voting).

No department shall have more than one member on COGE during any year. The terms of faculty members shall be for two years. Appointments of faculty members shall be staggered to allow continuity in membership. The term of the student member shall be for one year. All appointments to COGE may be renewed.

The Chair of COGE will be a faculty member appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Chair (outgoing) of the Curriculum Committee. The Chair of COGE will normally serve for a three-year term. The Chair of COGE will serve on the College Curriculum Committee. The Chair of COGE will have program responsibility (except for specialized accommodations as waiving and substituting courses, transfer courses and credits) and receive appropriate load credit and necessary support (clerical, financial, and other as needed).

2.5.4 The Writing Board (Revised 09/04/97)

The Writing Board consists of 10 persons. The standing members are

n the Coordinator of Writing

n the Director of the Writing Center

n the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences who will also serve as a liaison with the Student Engagement and Learning Committee, and the Faculty Forum on Teaching

Rotating members of the Writing Board are:

n one faculty member from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences

n one faculty member from the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development

n one faculty member from the School of Social Work

n one faculty member from the Center for Management and Technology

n one faculty member from Adam’s Library

n one staff member from the Office of Academic Support and Information Services

n one faculty member from the Committee on General Education

The rotating members of the Writing Board serve for two years staggered terms and are appointed by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee in consultation with the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee. The Chairperson is selected from among the faculty members by the members annually.

2.6 Reports from Subcommittees

The Chair of the Curriculum Committee is responsible for assuring that reports are presented in a timely fashion.

n The Chair of the Writing Board reports annually in May.

n The Chair of the Committee on General Education (COGE) reports to the Curriculum Committee at monthly meetings and presents an annual report in May.

n The Chair of the Committee on Student-Designed Majors presents an annual report in May.

n The Chair of the Committee on Individualized Graduate Programs reports annually in May.

n When appropriate, the Dean of the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Dean of the School of Social Work, and the Director of the Center for management and Technology report in April of each year on X5O and X8O courses that have been offered for more than three semesters.

n The Director of Continuing Education reports annually on courses offered off campus, under the auspices of the Office of Continuing Education. The report includes the name of the course, the course site, the course sponsor (department or division), instructor, and the consumers.

In writing reports, the subcommittees of the Curriculum Committee should follow the format found in the Appendix of this manual.

 

Chapter III

procedures of the curriculum committee

3.1 Meetings

Meetings of the Curriculum Committee are regularly scheduled for the third week of each month from September through May, except when this conflicts with vacations, convocations, etc. These meetings usually last about two hours. In recent years, the committee has met in the Board of Governors Room in Roberts Hall.

Extra meetings may be scheduled by the committee or called by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee in an emergency. An extra meeting is often needed to complete work for the College Catalog in order to meet the publication deadlines.

It is urged that all members attend meetings to give their information and insights and to assure the representation of their constituency. Substitutes and proxy votes are not authorized. Though the Committee is usually willing to listen to remarks by someone speaking for an absentee, it is urged that members be present by the scheduled starting time to avoid delay for lack of a quorum (a quorum consists of a majority of the voting membership).

The By-Law gives any faculty member the right to attend meetings, and this is generally extended to all members of the College community. This does not confer to all members of the College community the right to speak, but the committee usually will hear any remarks that would contribute to an understanding of the issues. It is expected that the originator of a proposal, or someone who can speak for him/her, will be present in case committee members wish to ask questions. Lack of such representation is often cause for postponing consideration of a proposal.

3.2 Agendas

The By-Law provides that the Chair of the Curriculum Committee prepare an agenda according to Robert’s Rules of Order. A typical agenda for a regular meeting includes

n Approval of the minutes of the previous meeting.

n Report of the Chair of the Curriculum Committee.

n Report of the Standing Committees or ad hoc committees.

n Old business .

n New business.

The By-Law calls for the agenda to be published in the Briefs a week in advance of the meeting. This means that the chair needs to prepare the agenda about two weeks before the meeting, allowing lead time for clerical work and distribution. Proposals are not placed on the agenda until they are reviewed by the Executive Committee. The meeting times for the Executive Committee are published each September. Proposals for the September meeting should be in the hand of the Chair of the Curriculum Committee before the first Friday in September (two weeks before the September meeting). Copies of the agenda and documents to be considered are distributed to all Committee members and department chairpersons one week prior to the meeting of the Curriculum Committee.

3.3 Conduct of Meetings

Meetings of the Curriculum Committee are conducted under Robert’s Rules of Order, except when modified by action of the committee.

Accordingly, most of the business of the meetings is conducted by voting on motions made and seconded by any members of the committee. Occasionally, other procedures (such as straw votes on several alternatives) may be used. On some matters, general consent is often requested and received as a way of expediting the business, but major motions are usually voted on, even if not in doubt.

Voting is normally by show of hands, with the secretary recording the number of ayes, nays, and expressed abstentions. Voice votes may be used if the outcome appears to be almost unanimous. If the chair cannot tell the outcome of a voice vote, a show of hands is requested. A member can refrain from responding to any of these categories. Individual votes are not recorded, except in the case of a specific request. A secret ballot could be asked for in accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order and in the election of officers. Substitute and proxy votes are not authorized.

3.4 Distribution of Materials

A strong effort is made to distribute documents one week in advance of the meeting so that committee members will have a chance to study the material and perhaps seek further information.

Minutes of the meetings and reports of the committee’s work are distributed to all committee members and to all persons who need to know of the changes approved. Other faculty can consult the minutes through the committee members. Minutes are distributed to all department chairpersons along with the documents for upcoming meetings.

Forms have been devised for reporting Curriculum Committee actions and/or recommendations to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and to the Office of the President and all other persons who must know the action of the Curriculum Committee. (See the Appendix—Action Forms.)

3.5 Deleting Courses from the Catalog

             The Curriculum Committee has the following course deletion policy:

a.     Annually, at the beginning of September, the Chair of the Curriculum Committee will request from the Director of the Records Office a report indicating which courses listed in the College Catalog have not been taught for three or more calendar years, and the last semester the course was taught. This report will be shared with the academic deans/director and members of the College Curriculum Committee.

b.     The appropriate academic dean will notify appropriate department chairs/program directors of the courses that have not been taught for three or more years and are subject to deletion.

c.     The department chair/program director has four weeks within which to object to the deletion of the course(s) and to supply an appropriate rationale as to why the course(s) should not be deleted. If the department chair/program director does not communicate with the academic dean in this regard, the academic dean will notify the Chair of the Curriculum Committee of their sole recommendation regarding deletion of the course(s).

d.          If the academic dean is notified that the department chair/program director objects to the deletion of a course(s), the two will discuss the situation and attempt to arrive at a mutually agreeable recommendation. If they agree, the academic dean will notify the Chair of the Curriculum Committee of their joint recommendation.

e.          If the two cannot arrive at a mutually agreeable recommendation, the academic dean will notify the Chair of the Curriculum Committee of the two opposing recommendations.

f.      Decisions for permanent exemption from this deletion policy and procedure can be granted only by the Curriculum Committee upon recommendation of the academic dean.

g.     All recommendations must be submitted to the Chair of the Curriculum Committee by the first Friday in November. The Chair will place on the agenda of the November meeting of the Curriculum Committee (or the next meeting to take place if there is no November meeting) a proposal regarding the deletion of courses not taught for three or more calendar years and the recommendations regarding deletion of these courses. If the decision is to delete the course, the Chair of the Curriculum Committee will submit an Action Form for approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the President.

     Since these policies and procedures are within the authority of the Curriculum Committee, notification by way of courtesy will be given to the Council of Rhode Island College. The course deletion policy will be in effect upon approval of the Curriculum Committee and supersedes all other policies or procedures in regard to deletion of courses (passed December 21, 2001). All other course deletions shall be accomplished through the process of submission of a transmittal form.

3.6 Glossary of Terms Used in the College Catalog

The following glossary of terms developed by the Office of News and Publications in 1993 are used in the College Catalog to define parts of programs:

Capstone means culminating or crowning; it is used to describe a course that is the culminating experience for a program of study (as in General Education).

Cognates are required courses in disciplines related to the major; they are intended to broaden and enhance the major.

Concentration is a group of courses that relates to a specific area of study within the major.

Curriculum represents the student’s total program of study (normally requiring a minimum of 120 semester hours) and usually consists of (1) the General Education Program; (2) a major, or for elementary education, a teaching concentration; (3) cognates; and (4) electives. Education curricula also require a professional education sequence. For the sake of clarity, "program of study" is preferred over "curriculum."

Electives are courses that the student may choose beyond the specifically required courses in order to fulfill the degree requirements (normally 120 semester hours for undergraduate degrees).

Emphasis—See Concentration.

Interdisciplinary major is a group of ten or more courses that form a major but that cut across departmental lines.

Major is the discipline or academic area that the student studies in depth (normally requiring a minimum of 30 semester hours).

Minor is a secondary specialization in a degree program (normally requiring a minimum of 15 semester hours).

Sequence is a listing of courses in the order they are to be taken by the student.

Specialization. See Major and Minor.

Specialized requirement is a course, or group of courses, within the major (this needs defining in order to set these courses apart from regular required courses or cognates).

Teacher education program is used in the elementary and secondary education curricula to describe the major and other requirements necessary to earn certification for teaching.

Teaching concentration is a group of seven to nine courses satisfying the requirement for a specialty in the elementary education curriculum.

Other terms such as focus, module, cluster, track, etc. should not be used to define programs and should be avoided in the text.

 

Chapter IV

Proposals and their preparation

4.1 Types of Proposals

This chapter is concerned mainly with proposals for new or changed programs, such as majors, concentrations, and graduate programs and new courses or changes in courses, such as changes in title, course number, credits, description, or prerequisites. A standard Transmittal Form must be submitted for all proposals of these types (see section 4.3). If the recommendation is for a new course or for a major revision of an existing course (as defined in section 4.4.1), then the Course Proposal Form must be submitted along with the Transmittal Form. If the recommendation is for a minor revision of an existing course (see section 4.4.1) or a minor revision of an existing program, then only the Transmittal Form need be submitted, as long as all necessary information is presented to the Curriculum Committee. If the recommendation is for a major revision of an existing program then several separate proposals may be required (see section 4.3 and 4.4). If the recommendation is for a new program then the proposal must appear in the format described in the "Policy and Procedures for the Review of Instructional Programs Development and Organizational Developments for Public Institutions of Higher Education." (Contact the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs for copies.)

The Curriculum Committee also receives proposals for policy statements, investigations, etc. either from individuals or from subcommittees. It is helpful to the Committee to have as specific a proposal as possible, particularly something that can easily be put in the form of a motion. An individual wishing to communicate with the Curriculum Committee for any of these purposes should contact the Chair of the Curriculum Committee.

4.2 General Information About the Preparation of Proposals

Audience

Proposers should remember that the audience for the proposal, primarily the members of the Curriculum Committee, will usually be much less familiar with the matter, especially its details, than is the writer of the proposal. Exposition in the proposal should be pitched at a level appropriate for the readers. Likewise, if the proposal is adopted, then many of the people affected by it—such as students, advisors, Records Office, and Publishing Service personnel—may not be familiar with the details or nuances. The proposal (with perhaps a partial exception for course descriptions) should be clear to nonspecialists.

 

Checking

After a proposal has been drafted or revised, the proposer and any reviewers should check it over for consistency, completeness, and clarity. (This need is emphasized by an estimate that the Curriculum Committee rejects, defers, or refers back more proposals because of inconsistencies, omissions, or obscurities than because of disagreement with the essence of the proposal.) Even when time presses, omission of the checking may delay rather than expedite matters or may take up time of the members of the Curriculum Committee that they could better devote to other matters.

Submission of Proposals

Normally, a proposal is acted upon by the department concerned and by the appropriate dean or director before it is submitted to the Curriculum Committee. In the case of proposals involving more than one department, a more elaborate procedure may be needed. Proposals for revision of the General Education Program must be approved or considered and signed by the Committee on General Education before submission to the Curriculum Committee. Proposals for new or revised graduate programs or individual graduate courses must be acted upon by the Graduate Committee before submission to the Curriculum Committee. Proposals for new programs and/or substantial revisions of existing programs must be approved by the Board of Governors for Higher Education.

The By-law for the Curriculum Committee provides that "The Committee shall . . . consider suggestions for curriculum development from the administration, division, departments, individual faculty members, and students." However, if the Committee receives (from sources other than its members or subcommittees) proposals that have not been discussed at the normal approval levels, the Committee is likely to refer the proposals to those levels for recommendation unless there is general sentiment for investigation by a subcommittee.

Reproduction and Distribution

The proposer is responsible for providing one edited, clean, original copy of the proposal, suitable for reproduction to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs at least two weeks in advance of a regularly scheduled meeting. All documents must be typed with at least a one-inch margin on the left and a one inch margin at the top.

Clerical support to the Curriculum Committee is handled by the secretary to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who assigns document numbers, arranges for reproduction, and makes the distribution of proposals. Proposals should be delivered to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs for processing after being checked for completeness by the proposer.

 

The Executive Committee

The Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee examines proposals for completeness (including necessary signatures) and conformity to committee policy. This Committee then recommends or does not recommend that the proposal be placed on the agenda of the next Curriculum Committee. Failure to recommend placement on the agenda means the proposal is returned to the author for repairs or revision or consultation with other concerned elements of the College community. If a proposal is returned to the author, the Chair of the Curriculum Committee confers with the author about needed revisions. If there are minor problems with a proposal, the Executive Committee may recommend placement on the agenda and the Chair may inform the author that amendments should be made to effect repairs on the floor of the Curriculum Committee. These amendments are made by the representatives of the author‘s constituency or by a member of the Executive Committee.

The necessary amendments are discussed by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee and the author and the representative. Only members of the Curriculum Committee may make motions to amend a document before the Committee.

The Curriculum Committee

The Curriculum Committee receives proposals listed on its agenda, and after deliberation, approves or disapproves a proposal. If a proposal is not approved by the Curriculum Committee, it may be referred back to the author with an explanation of the reasons for disapproval. The proposal may be revised and resubmitted. If the proposal is approved, an Action Form (see Appendix I) is completed by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee, which includes the proposal and any amendments to the proposal. This is forwarded to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who signs or does not sign the Action Form after checking it for content and forwards it to the President who approves or disapproves an action by the Curriculum Committee. Proposals that are disapproved by the President are returned to the Curriculum Committee for reconsideration. Approved proposals are distributed to the author and/or the department, center, or program affiliate of the author; the Records Office for the recorder; the Office of Publishing Services for inclusion in the catalog, if appropriate; the Vice President for Academic Affairs; and the Chair of the Curriculum Committee.

The action contained in a proposal becomes official only after presidential approval and the author or department of the author receives the returned document with the signature of the President on it.

Timing

The Curriculum Committee meets regularly each month. Materials to be considered should be in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs at least two weeks before the meeting.

Policy

It is the policy of the Chair of the Curriculum Committee with the advice of the Executive Committee of the Curriculum Committee to refuse to accept, for agenda, proposals that are incomplete or that do not contain necessary information as outlined in the Curriculum Committee Manual. It is the responsibility of the proposer to keep abreast of any changes in these requirements. (1/26/77 #2.1)

The Chair of the Curriculum Committee will receive new course proposals (changes in curricula, degree, or major) and place them on the agenda of the Curriculum Committee in chronological or logical order as received with other proposals. Representatives of the proposers will be asked to be present and discuss the program (including a description of the development of the program and the various segments of the College community consulted in the preparation) with the Committee. Often proposals with interdepartmental or institutional concerns will be considered at one meeting with final action postponed until a subsequent meeting. (5/18/77 #3)

All academic departments and appropriate offices will be notified annually that no program or course proposals received by the Committee after the December meeting of a catalog year can be guaranteed inclusion in the College Catalog published the following July/August. (3/15/83 report of Chair)

Proposals must be received by the Chair of the Curriculum Committee before the first Friday of September to be included on the September agenda.

The Curriculum Committee does not have jurisdiction over administrative arrangements for implementing approved proposals. Hence, mention in the proposal of administrative arrangements is viewed by the committee as only informational.

    4.3 Transmittal Form*

A transmittal for must be submitted for all types of proposals. The Curriculum Committee has adopted a standard transmittal form for proposals as reproduced in the appendix. It is strongly urged that the completed form involve a facsimile of this. Spacing may be varied to suit the needs of a particular proposal. If a question on the form is not applicable, it is better to say so rather than to omit the question. For instance, if the proposal does not require action by the Graduate Committee, the entry must read "Graduate Committee Action: Not Applicable" or "NA." The following guidelines specify how each item on the Transmittal Form should be completed.

Document ID # and Reception Date in the upper right corner should be left blank. These will be filled in when the proposal is received by the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Name of the Originator

Identify the person making the proposal. Also include the "Date." This is the date the proposal came into existence and is a convenient tag for reference. It serves to distinguish different drafts or revisions which otherwise cause confusion. This name is requested so that the Committee can contact a specific person if questions arise.

Affiliation of the Originator

Identify the name or title of the program, department, or office with which the originator of the proposal is associated. If there is no such affiliation, indicate that this information is not applicable.

Desired Date of Implementation

Indicate the recommended semester (fall or summer) and year when the action involved on the proposal is desired to become official (part of the college curriculum or policy (e.g. fall 1998). This does not guarantee implementation by that date.

State What You Want the College Curriculum Committee to Do

Provide a very specific statement of what action is desired so that if a motion is made "to approve the proposal" it will be clear exactly what is thereby moved. In case of a change of course or program, it is helpful to say not only what the new version is but what the change is. A desire to approve a new course might read "Approve a new course ENGLISH 598: Alien Literature." A desire to modify an existing program might read: (1) Drop the following courses from the Technology Education program of study: IT-201, IT-241, IT-300, and IT-305. (2) Add the following courses to the Technology Education program of study: IT-203, IT-315." A desire to change the prerequisite for a course might read: Change the prerequisite for Mathematics 334 from Mathematics 313 to Mathematics 333.

State Why You Want the College Curriculum Committee to Approve This Proposal

Give specific curricular reasons for the proposal. These reasons must explain how and why the changes included in the proposal strengthen the curriculum of a department, a program, a major, or a concentration. Some curricular reasons that might be cited include the changing knowledge base of the field, updated technical language and terminology, references to changing needs of students and society, relationships to and/or consistency with other College programs, projections regarding future employment or professional needs, and changes in content emphasis. When revisions of programs are in response to external evaluations, the proposal must include the curricular reasons for the revisions.

In cases where the proposal involves a new course, a revision of a previously existing course, a new emphasis, program or concentration, or a revision of a program, concentration or major, clear relation must be made between the proposal, department curricular goals, and the major goals of the College. Every effort should be made to explain how the content of the proposal relates to the total curriculum of the College and to the mission and goals of the College.

Describe the impact of This Proposal On Students and Faculty

A) Students. Indicate if the proposal increases or decreases credits or requirements for students; involves an off-campus investment of time; imposes any unusual or new opportunities for students. Does the proposal change the total credits required for any degree?

B) Faculty. Indicate whether or not the elements of the proposal can be supported with existing faculty and how this can be done. If not, how many new positions would be needed to support the recommendations in the proposal. Indicate if the administration has been consulted in the event of needed increases in faculty. Provision of this information does not guarantee that any changes in faculty will be forthcoming even though the proposal is approved by the Curriculum Committee and forwarded to the President with a recommendation for approval.

Describe the Impact of the Proposal on College Resources

A) Departmental—Indicate any additional resources that the department needs to implement this proposal, (staff, space, computers, software) and indicate how such needs may be met.

B) Library—Indicate whether additional resources must be acquired for the library to support the action recommended in the proposal. List all the necessary acquisitions on the form, including materials other than journals.

C) Technological—Indicate if implementation of the proposal requires added resources like audiovisual, media, computers and/or site licenses, main frame time, computer lab reservations, special hardware or software or special equipment of any kind.
The proposer should discuss any need for additional resources with the appropriate chairperson or director, who should acknowledge this conversation (see section 4.3.10). This acknowledgment signature does not indicate approval or support of the proposal. Identification of the above needs (A, B, or C) does not guarantee that they will be forthcoming, even though the proposal is approved by the Curriculum Committee.

 

List All Segments of the College Affected by the Proposal

List all schools, departments, and/or programs of the College affected directly or tangentially by the proposal. The author of the proposal must make a good faith effort to identify and list all of these elements of the College.

All faculty should monitor the agenda of the Curriculum Committee published in the Briefs, consult with an available department chair and/or their representative on the Curriculum Committee. Faculty and interested members of the College community should avail themselves of the opportunity to express their views to their representative on the Curriculum Committee, their Dean and/or the Chair of the Curriculum Committee about concerns related to proposals being considered. They should attend meetings when it seems advisable in order to address the Committee on issues related to proposals, policies, and relevant topics.

List All pages in the Catalog Affected by this Proposal

Attach copies of all pages affected and indicate the changes to be made. Identify all pages of the current catalog affected by the proposal. Indicate the year of the catalog being referenced. This is important since a new catalog might be issued between the time the proposal is prepared and the time that the proposal is considered by the Curriculum Committee. Actual copies of the catalog page(s) may be submitted with the corrections indicated. For proposals recommending a new course, the course description should be provided on the accompanying Course Proposal Form. The course description should not appear in item 3.9 of the Transmittal Form.

Other important information

Provide any other information that would be helpful and informative for the Curriculum Committee in its deliberations.

Acknowledgments

Obtain signatures of all persons in charge of other elements of the College affected by this proposal. If a proposal directly or tangentially involves or affects resources provided by or activities of other elements of the College, such as the library, OASIS, computer center, multimedia center, or other departments, signatures indicating awareness (not necessarily endorsement or approval) of the impact of the proposal must be obtained by the author of the proposal. These signatures may be accompanied by statements of support (or nonsupport) for the proposal if appropriate. Affected persons may appear before the Curriculum Committee to speak for or against a proposal.

Approvals

Obtain signatures with dates from all appropriate individuals before submitting the proposal to the Curriculum Committee. Proposals without the required signatures will not be considered. The chair or director of the department originating the proposal must sign on the line labeled "Department Action." The appropriate dean(s) and/or director(s) must sign on the appropriate line. Proposals that involve more than one element of the College, such as Faculty Arts and Sciences and Feinstein School of Education and Human Development, or Department of Management and Technology and Social Work must be signed by all concerned deans or directors. If a proposal involves a general education course or policy in any way, the proposal must come before COGE for consideration and signature. If COGE disapproves a proposal which has General Education implications, the proposal may come before the Curriculum Committee on appeal from a negative response from COGE, but rarely will the Curriculum Committee contradict a decision by its own subcommittee. If a proposal involves a graduate level course or a graduate program, it must come before the College Graduate Committee for consideration, approval, and signature by the chair of the Graduate Committee. Should the Graduate Committee fail to approve a proposal, the proposer may appeal to the Curriculum Committee but rarely would the Curriculum Committee contradict a decision by the Graduate Committee.

4.4. Supporting Documentation

While a transmittal form must accompany every recommendation, additional documentation must be provided depending on the nature of the recommendation. See the subsections listed below for the additional requirements for each type of recommendation.

4.4.1 Revision or Deletion of an Existing Course
4.4.2 Proposal for a New Course
4.4.3 Revision of an Existing Undergraduate Program
4.4.4 Revision of an Existing Graduate Program
4.4.5 Revision of Existing Policy or Practice or a New Policy or Practice

4.4.1 Revision or Deletion of an Existing Course

A revision of an existing course may be major or minor. Minor revisions of an existing course include a change of course number, a change of title, a change of prerequisites, a change of grading system, the deletion of the course, or editorial changes in the course description. A substantive change of the course description is a major revision. A change in the contact hours and/or number of credits is a major revision and must be accompanied by a substantive change in the course description. For a minor revision of an existing course, only the Transmittal Form (see section 4.3) and the edited copies of relevant pages in the current catalog need be submitted. A major revision of an existing course requires the submittal of the Transmittal Form (see section 4.3), the Course Proposal Form (see section 4.4.2), and any additional supporting documentation as described in section 4.4.2.

4.4.2 Proposal for a New Course

Recommendations for new courses and for major revisions of existing courses (as defined in section 4.1), require the completion of the Course Proposal Form. The information provided on the front side of the Course Proposal Form is information that the Curriculum Committee must approve for the College Catalog. Therefore, this information must be exact and complete and correct. Information on the second page is for the benefit of the Curriculum Committee in its deliberations relative to the proposal. It should be complete. Too much information about the curricular nature of the course is better than too little information. Course objectives in terms of expectations for student performance and/or teacher performance may be included and are most helpful to the Committee in its deliberations. The following paragraphs provide guidelines for completing each item on the Course Proposal Form.

Check the appropriate blank if this proposal involves a new course or major revision of an existing course.

Course Title (maximum of six words)

Enter the course‘s program acronym and number, a colon, and the course title. This should be underlined and must be exactly as you wish it to appear in the Catalog (example: French 111: The French Novel). The course program acronym identifies the section of the College Catalog in which the new course will be listed. Check the current catalog to see the correct and current sequence of symbols to be used for the acronym. The proposer should check that any number is not in current or recent use for a different course. This involves not only courses in the existing catalog, but courses approved since that catalog went to press. Even a number that has recently (within the last five years) been used for a different course is not allowed because of confusion in transcripts.

The first digit of the course number must indicate the level of the course. Courses whose first digit is 0 carry college credit but do not count toward graduation requirements. Courses whose first digit 1 or 2 are lower division undergraduate courses primarily for freshmen or sophomores. Courses whose first digits are 3 or 4 are upper-division undergraduate courses are usually taken by juniors or seniors. Courses whose first digit is 4 may be taken by graduate students. Courses whose first digit is 5 are graduate courses to which undergraduates are not admitted. Courses whose first digit is 6 are courses in the joint doctoral program available only to doctoral students. The middle digit of the course number can convey special information. If the middle digit of a course is 6 then the course is a seminar or a general education core course; if 8, a workshop; if 9, directed study. Courses numbered x50 (where the first digit x indicates the level of the course) are either courses of temporary topical content or courses under development. Courses numbered x80 are workshop courses of temporary topical content. Proposals for x50 and x80 courses must be approved by the appropriate dean or director but do not come before the Curriculum Committee and are not listed in the College Catalog. An x50 or x80 course may be offered no more than three times with the same content. At this point the course should be proposed formally as a new course for inclusion in the College Catalog unless there are extenuating circumstances as determined by the dean, director, or Vice President for Academic Affairs with reports to the Curriculum Committee.

Course Description

Briefly state the content and aims of the course, in paragraph form, using complete sentences. The course description must conform to the editorial policy for the catalog, contain at most 30 words, be concise, and contain appropriate vocabulary for the intended audience—the student. It should provide information to the student so that he/she has a reasonable expectation of the nature of the course content. The course descriptions of graduate courses must indicate graduate level content. Any special notes or explanatory remarks regarding the conduct of the course or who might take it should appear in the course description. In particular, the course description must clearly indicate any laboratories, studios, or off-campus experiences required for the course. See the College Catalog for examples of course descriptions.

Some courses are double listed in more than one section of the catalog and thus are under the aegis of more than one department or program. Students may not receive double credit for enrollment in double listed courses. The following sentence must appear in the description of all double listed courses; "Students may not receive credit for both XXX and YYY." This sentence should appear in italics at the end of both descriptions of double listed course descriptions.

Number of Contact Hours

State the actual number of hours required in class, studio, internships, practica, and/or laboratory each week. There are contractual restrictions on the number of contact hours for faculty and academic policy restrictions on the number of contact hours for students. See the appropriate dean or director for additional information. If this number is different from the number of credits for a course, the contact hours appear in parenthesis in front of the number of credits for a course in the catalog.

Number of credits

State the number of semester hours a student is to receive for the course. This is determined by the department in consultation with the appropriate dean or director. Usually courses carry no more than four credits. Special courses such as student teaching and some internships can carry more than four credits determined, in part, by the number of weekly contact hours.

Prerequisites

State the prerequisites required for the course. College policy requires that all new courses at the 300- and 400 level have at least one prerequisite course at the 100- or 200- level. Courses at the 500- and 600 level must list "graduate status" as a prerequisite. If approval, rather than specific courses, is required, then "approval of the department chair" should appear. This is easier to administer than "approval of the instructor," since the department chair or his/her representative is more accessible to students.

General Education Category

Indicate by checking the appropriate GE category for the proposed course. If the course is to be a general education course, approval of COGE must be acquired before submission to the Curriculum Committee. The same forms should be used for submission to both Committees.

Frequency offered

Check all appropriate categories. If a course is to be offered alternate springs check "spring" and "even years or odd years." If alternate years is checked indicate the last two digits of the year the alternation is to start.

Grading system

Check which grade system will be used to report student performance in the course to the Records Office. System 2 and 3 are not options for some courses and must be used for other courses. Check with the appropriate dean or director for information about this.

Photocopy

Provide a photocopy of the page(s) in the current catalog on which the course description is to appear. Also indicate on a photocopied page where the course number is to be added to lists of required courses, restricted electives, cognates, and/or electives, for the proposing program and all other programs affected by the proposal.

Course Purpose

Indicate the position (requirement, elective, cognate, category) of the course in academic programs (majors, minors, concentrations, general education) and the expected clientele for the course.

Instructional Method

Indicate the instructional method to be used to accomplish course objectives. Add descriptions of alternatives that are not on the list.

Possible Texts, CDs, and/or Programs

List sources of instructional content to which students would have access. Year of publication is especially important. Include authors and title and publisher data in appropriate bibliographic form.

Means of Evaluating Student Performance

Indicate the source of information that will be used to arrive at grades for this proposed course. Check as many sources as are appropriate and add explanatory notes as appropriate. This is especially important when sources for this information involve persons located at off-campus sites.

Course Content

Attach a topical outline or course syllabus. This item involves description of the course content. Two-level outlines are desired to provide sufficient detail for the Committee.

Other Significant Notes

Add any other information that would be helpful to the Committee in its deliberations.

4.4.3 Revision of an Existing Undergraduate Program

Proposals recommending the revision of an existing program require submission of the Transmittal Form (see section 4.3) and catalog copy that clearly indicates all desired changes in the College Catalog (see section 4.3.3). Item 4 of the Transmittal Form will take the form of imperative statements, i.e. ’Revise the major in Women‘s Studies.‘‘The proposer must also submit any additional information needed to communicate the intent of the recommendation to the Curriculum Committee as described below.

A recommendation for the revision of an existing program can be major or minor. Minor revisions include the addition and/or deletion of courses involving no more than 20 percent of the courses in the program. Major revisions include the addition and/or deletion of courses involving more than 20 percent of the courses in the program or a change in the structure of the program such as a change in the number of concentrations or the addition of a minor. The proposal for a minor revision consists only of the Transmittal Form, edited catalog copy, and any additional information for the information of the Committee.

The proposal for a major revision of an existing program must contain an extensive rationale that includes a description of the current program (which can be taken from the current College Catalog), identification of problems with the current program or reasons why it should be changed, and an explanation of how the proposed revision will fix these problems. The rationale should include the educational objectives for the program and indicate how the program plans to reach those objectives. A tabular comparison of the requirements in the existing and the proposed programs does facilitate understanding and should accompany the proposal.

If the revision of a program requires the addition, deletion, or revision of courses then separate proposals must be submitted for each of these recommendations (see sections 4.4.1 and 4.4.2 for additional information). A separate Transmittal Form and supporting documentation must be submitted for each of these proposals. These proposals must be presented to the Curriculum Committee in the following order:

1. The Transmittal form with additional numbered pages to explicate the rationale.
2. Proposals for the revision of existing courses.
3. Proposals for the addition of new courses.
4. Proposals for the deletion of existing courses.
5. Proposals for new program structures.
6. A plan for implementing the new program.
7. Proposals for the deletion of existing programs.
8. Undergraduate Proposal Form , including catalog copy.

Type of Program Revision

Check the appropriate blank to indicate the type of program revision involved in the proposal.

Program Title, Discipline

Indicate the culminating degree of the program being revised (as BA, or BS, or BSW, or BGS, RITE, or . . . ). This item is here since changes in degree requirements are reported to the Board of Governors. Indicate the discipline of the program being revised as Industrial Technology or Afro-American Studies or Social Work or General Studies or . . . This is usually the designation of the department in which the program is located but may differ from the department title when departments have subdivisions, such as Justice Studies in the Department of Sociology or Gerontology in the Department of Sociology. Special Education and Elementary Education programs should identify the specialty.

Program Identification

Indicate if the proposed revision involves a change in a minor, major, concentrations within a major, specialization, etc. This will usually appear in conjunction with the appropriate discipline as, for example, the major in Anthropology with a concentration in Prehistoric Tombs, or Secondary Education with a major in Home Economics.

Program Summary

Check and provide information only for the appropriate items listed below. If an item is not appropriate indicate NA (Not Applicable). If categories below do not apply to your program, change them to fit. Check the current catalog for the format for these items.

a. Introductory Paragraph for catalog copy
In the introductory descriptive paragraph(s) of the program in the catalog are to be changed, provide complete exact copy of the new description. Be as parsimonious yet as informative as appropriate. Consider the audience.

b. Required courses ( ) semester hours
Provide exact and complete identification of the changes to be printed in the catalog if the proposal to revise the program is approved. Be sure to record the accurate number of semester hours or the range of semester hours to be allocated to required courses if the proposal is approved.

c. Concentration ( ) semester hours
Provide exact and complete identification of the changes to be printed in the catalog if the proposal to revise the program is approved. Be sure to record the accurate number of semester hours or the range of semester hours to be allocated to required courses if the proposal is approved.

d. Cognates ( ) semester hours
Provide exact and complete identification of the changes to be printed in the catalog if the proposal to revise the program is approved. Be sure to record the accurate number of semester hours or the range of semester hours to be allocated to required courses if the proposal is approved.

e. Professional courses ( ) semester hours
Provide exact and complete identification of the changes to be printed in the catalog if the proposal to revise the program is approved. Be sure to record the accurate number of semester hours or the range of semester hours to be allocated to required courses if the proposal is approved.

d. Total ( ) semester hours
Indicate the total number of or range of semester hours involved in the program should the change be approved.

Special Admission Requirements

Some undergraduate programs have special admission requirements above and/or beyond admission requirements for the College. Paragraphs appear in the catalog describing these special admission requirements. If the proposal involves revision of these paragraphs indicate exact catalog copy for the new paragraphs and check for accuracy. If the proposal does not involve these paragraphs omit this item.

Special Retention Requirements

Provide revised and exact catalog copy for any changes in the paragraph(s) that describe and/or list these requirements.

Paragraph Summary of Minor and/or Honors Program

Provide exact catalog copy of any proposed revisions in these paragraphs if appropriate.

Photocopy

Copy all pages from the current catalog that are affected (at all) by the proposed changes and mark the changes that are to occur if the proposal is approved. Indicate the year and pages of the catalog.

4.4.4 Revision of an Existing Graduate Program

Proposals recommending the revision of an existing graduate program require submission of the Transmittal Form (see section 4.3) and catalog copy that clearly indicates all desired changes in the College Catalog. The proposer must also submit any additional information needed to communicate the intent of the recommendation to the Curriculum Committee.

A recommendation for the revision of an existing graduate program can be major or minor. Minor revisions include the addition and/or deletion of courses involving no more than 20 percent of the courses in the program. Major revisions include the addition and/or deletion of courses involving more than 20 percent of the courses in the program or a change in the structure of the program. The proposal for a minor revision consists of the Transmittal Form and any additional information implied by the items on the Transmittal Form (e.g. statements from other concerned departments).

The proposal for a major revision of an existing program must contain an extensive rationale on the Transmittal Form that includes a description of the current program (which can be taken from the current College Catalog), identification of problems with the current program or reasons why it should be changed, and an explanation of how the proposed revision will fix these problems. The rationale should include the educational objectives for the program and indicate how the program plans to reach those objectives. A tabular comparison of the requirements in the existing and the proposed programs will facilitate understanding and should accompany the proposal.

If the revision of a program requires the addition, deletion, or revision of courses then separate proposals must be submitted for each of these recommendations (see sections 4.4.1 and 4.4.2 for additional information). A separate Transmittal Form and supporting documentation must be submitted for each of these proposals. These proposals must be presented to the Curriculum Committee in the following order:

1. The Transmittal Form with any additional pages required for a complete rationale attached and numbered.

2. Proposals for the revision of existing courses.

3. Proposals for the addition of new courses.

4. Proposals for the deletion of existing courses.

5. Proposals for new program structures.

6. A plan for implementing the new program.

4. Proposals for the deletion of existing programs.

8. Graduate Program Proposal Form , including catalog copy.

Items on the Graduate Program Proposal Form should be completed as follows:

Type of Proposal

Indicate the type of proposal. If the proposal is for a new program, the author must follow the procedures for new programs decreed by the RI. Board of Governors for Higher Education. Directions for completing such documentation are available from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. These procedures should be completed instead of the forms for the R.I. College Curriculum Committee.

Program Title

Indicate the degree involved in the proposal (MA, or MS, or MSW, or MAT, or MED, or MPA, or MFA, or CAGS, or Ph.D.) and the discipline of the program, which usually is the department in which the program to be revised is or will be housed, for example, MAT in History.

Program Description

Provide exact catalog copy of the program to be revised. This is the paragraph or paragraphs that verbally describe the program to be revised and appear in the catalog section of the department or administrative sub-unit in which the program is housed. Be concise and aware of the audience who is the student.

Program Summary

This summary is described on the back side (second side) of the Graduate Program Proposal Form. Identify the program with the degree and discipline as, for example, CAGS in School Psychology. List the actual courses by acronym and number, in ordinal sequence by department, which are in the proposed revision of the program. Include the total number of semester hours or range of hours for each appropriate requirement category on the form. Include only those categories that will change should the proposal be approved. Be sure to indicate the new total semester hours at the bottom of the page.

Admission Requirements

Provide exact catalog copy for any revision of the paragraphs describing admission requirements for the program. This paragraph will be affected by the proposal.

Special Retention Requirements

Provide exact catalog copy of any and all revisions of special retention requirements that would appear in the catalog if the proposal is approved.

Photocopy

Provide photocopies of all pages in the current catalog that will be affected by the proposal should the proposal be approved. Mark all needed revisions clearly and indicate the year of publication and pages of the catalog that need changes.

4.4.5 Proposal for the Revision of Existing Curricular Policy or Curricular Practice or for a New Curricular Policy or Curricular Practice

Proposals for revisions of existing curricular policy, curricular practice, or for new policy or procedures must be submitted on the Transmittal Form (see section 4.3) with all appropriate information supplied. Ordinarily changes in such practice and/or policy are the concern of the whole College community so steps should be taken to make the whole community aware of such proposals and their imminent appearance before the Curriculum Committee. However, the section on the Transmittal Form regarding Other Segments of the College affected by the Proposal need not be accompanied by documentation from all elements of the College. This section of the Transmittal Form should be accompanied by some assurances of public awareness of the proposal. The Curriculum Committee may schedule open hearings on proposals of far-reaching implications, if appropriate, or may agree if requested to do so. Note that proposals for changes in Academic policy or practice must be sent to the Committee on Academic Policy and Procedures or to the Executive Committee of the Rhode Island College Council.

The Rationale section of the Transmittal Form for these proposals is most important and should be expanded to give detailed explanation with supporting evidence (not merely anecdotal) of the need for the proposed revision of policy or practice. It should also describe the possible impact on the College—faculty, students, staff, administration and resources. The Rationale section may require additional pages, which should be attached to the Transmittal Form so that sufficient information is available for the Curriculum Committee in its deliberations. Charts, tables, or graphs are welcome and are effective methods of presenting information. Persons contemplating proposals of this type ought to contact the Chair of the Curriculum Committee if they have questions about the preparation of proposals.